Raw Number at CPSB Require Deeper Investigation

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by Marion Marks

Employment in CPSB system went from 6,142 to 5,810 between years 2012 and 2014. We know there are schools whose staff has vanished from these rolls due to the schools that have moved off the rolls. But the staff positions lost seem to be less teaching or student-contact positions and almost the same central office and administrative staff. Here are the actual financial comparisons of costs supplied by the CPSB.

Coding of expenses related to personnel has always been a moving target, as reassigning codes to define the role people play in the system can be a way to hide pay raises, cloud issues of department cuts and responsibility as well as make it difficult for the public to grasp what really is going on in the system. My contention is that every administrator under fire finds a way to recode data that shifts the focus away from failure. Bad Data

The fact that large numbers of employees have been given new code classifications that didn’t exist in the 2012 records can be explained as simply “streamlining reporting.” However, the streamlining process seems to also be justification for a failure to recognize the dynamics of educational administration are required to make far greater changes that the system is prepared to meet.

Time-To-Hide-Data
Just like bad data… hide…

Clearly the State of Louisiana has made monumental strides to accept that the twenty-first century educational requirements have skipped too many residents. Pockets of excellence in education may exist in Louisiana, but too many failures exist that require something similar to the “Transformation Zone” approach some schools have attempted in Caddo. Superintendent Goree, to his credit, admits and can be validated in some public record documents, that it doesn’t cost a great deal more to shake up campus administrators, teachers and students with what has been called “fresh paint, rigid expectations, discipline and creative energy.”

All this considered, the Midway administrators and school board MUST do a far better job of selling their bond issue to the voters than I have seen to date. I support taxation that will support a better educational system, but the complex structure we see today doesn’t appear to provide a better student-teacher environment proposal.

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